Past Conferences:
Agile Testing Days
Europe's greatest Agile software testing event!
November 13–17, 2017, Potsdam, Germany
  • New Year’s Resolutions – why they don’t work by Linda Rising

  • ATD Mondays Introductory

AGILE TESTING DAYS PRESENTS

ATD Mondays

From now on, Mondays will be something that you love.

Tune in when a variety of remarkable people of the agile and testing community share useful tips, best practices and big ideas.

In less than 18 minutes, you get inspired and gain new insights and knowledge. If you have more questions, look at our FAQ here.

Watch and learn. Join us every Monday at 4pm (CET) on our Agile Testing Days Youtube channel.

 

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Schedule

Monday

23

Jan '17
04:00 PM

Transferring testing skills to the whole team by Lisa Crispin

We can only build quality into our product when the whole team takes responsibility for testing activities. How do team members who lack testing skills get engaged? Testers can help fellow teammates get traction with gaining shared understanding of stories during planning meetings, guiding development with customer-facing tests, writing test charters, exploratory testing, and other types of testing. Lisa shares some quick tips for helping non-tester team members learn testing skills.

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Lisa Crispin- Portrait
Monday

30

Jan '17
04:00 PM

10 Tips for Writing Great User Stories by Roman Pichler

User stories are probably the most popular agile technique to capture product functionality. Working with user stories is easy. But telling effective stories can be hard. This talk shares ten proven tips to help you create great user stories, develop the right software, and test it effectively.

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Roman Pichler- Portrait
Monday

06

Feb '17
04:00 PM

Creating a unit testing strategy by Gil Zilberfeld

Once we’ve started to unit test, we concentrate on the next piece of code we want to tests. While tactically it maybe the right thing to do, we should think as unit testing as part of whole strategy in testing the feature, and approach in a more structured way.

There are a series of questions we need to answer before and during the development, and even after we’re finished. The method takes into account both TDD and test-after, and specifically works well for legacy systems. It’s a holistic approach to where the tests fit into the development environment and how the code is developed.

The process starts with how we understand the problem and the design, thinking about which tests we need, existing and introduced testability, dealing with design constraints, identifying dependencies and more. Writing tests becomes a small (but still important) part of the process, and it doesn’t end there.

Deciding to write tests for our code is a great big step. Let’s take it a step further and actually think about how to do it.

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Gil Zilberfeld- Portrait
Monday

13

Feb '17
04:00 PM

Agile in Distributed Teams by Karen Greaves & Sam Laing

In the ideal perfect world there will be rainbows and unicorns and teams that all sit together. In reality most teams have to deal with distribution in one form or another. For some its team members spread across a building, for others its team members in other parts of the world in different time zones. We will provide some tips to help agile work better for these teams.

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Karen Greaves- Portrait
Sam Laing- Portrait
Monday

20

Feb '17
04:00 PM

How to stop hating UI tests by Alex Schladebeck

Lots of people hate UI testing because they’ve suffered through bad projects. In this talk, I’ll take a brief look at why people hate UI testing, and we’ll see what can be done to alleviate the problems with scalability, brittleness and lack of maintainability.

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Alex Schladebeck- Portrait
Monday

27

Feb '17
04:00 PM

Agile Testing Principles: Low, early, all the time and all of us. by Alexander Schwartz

Decisions making regarding your (Agile) test strategy can be quite non-trivial. There are some principles that can guide you, that maybe help to make consious decisions:

  1. Low = Imagine you play tetris with your test aspects, every aspect is automated as low as possible with respect to the architecture, building the nice famous testing pyramid.
  2. Early = Establish all Quality Assurance apsects and practices early in the progress.
  3. All the time = Aim for Continous Quality to keep the Quality Debt low over time, and to stay all the time close to the desired quality level.
  4. All of us = Rather than having a few prople that are responsible for testing or Quality, ensure it’s everyones responsibility — and increase the test (automation) and QA capabilities in the team by increasing the “”T-shape””iness of the team mates.
... more
Alexander Schwartz- Portrait

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